Logo 12th IMPR

Sessions

 

1) Phytolith morphology, nomenclature, taxonomy and morphometry

The session “Phytoliths morphology, nomenclature, taxonomy and morphometry” welcomes contributions in the study of phytolith taxonomy, including the application of the ICPN 2.0. Within the session we look also for studies that enhance interpretations based on phytolith morphometric advances besides morphological characteristics.

2) Phytoliths as a proxy for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction

Within this session “Phytoliths as a proxy for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction” contributions are welcome that use phytoliths by themselves thogether with other proxies, for palaeoecological reconstruction of past environments and vegetation history.

3) Phytoliths in integrated archaeobotanical and ethnoarchaeological studies

The session “Phytoliths in integrated archaeobotanical and ethnoarchaeological studies” is dedicated to the application of phytoliths in archaeological contexts and materials. Contributions that show comparison of the phytolith record with the records from other archaeobotanical materials (starch, macrofossils, charcoal, pollen and NPPs, plant biomarkers), as well as with archaeological and ethnographic insights, are particularly welcome.

4) Phytoliths in geoarchaeology and micromorphology

In the session “Phytoliths in geoarchaeology and micromorphology” we look for contributions that present the application of phytolith analysis in micromorphology. In addition, issues of phytolith taphonomy and deposit formation influencing the phytolith record are welcome. A microscopy workshop related to this session will be also organised.

5) Phytolith formation, quantification and role in modern plants

Studies on the processes of phytoliths formation and on taphonomy through experimental approaches and modern reference collections are at the core of the session “Phytoliths formation, quantification and role in modern plants”.

6) Phytoliths and the biogeochemical cycles of silicon and carbon

The session “Phytoliths and the biogeochemical cycles of silicon and carbon" welcomes studies of biogeochemical components within phytoliths and the application of isotopic analysis and radiocarbon dating based on the phytolith records.